February 2022 Newsletter

 
   

February 2022, Issue: 32

February 2022 edition of the Probit newsletter

Dear member of the Probit research panel:

As we are in the heart of the 2022 winter season, we would like to share some of the recent survey results we collected about our panel members’ outlook on the COVID-19 outbreak, the time it will take until things return to normal, and the stress level they are experiencing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the same survey, we also asked if Canada should create a set of national standards when it comes to implementing pandemic-related restrictions, and whether the varying death rates between provinces is due more to random chance than different provincial government policies.


Your views

According to our recent poll, a majority (66 per cent) of our panel members said the worst is behind us. The majority – or 72 per cent – of Ontarians polled said the worst is behind us, compared to 66 per cent on average. The same number (72 per cent) of those who self-identify as middle class said the same (compared to 66 per cent on average). This means Ontarians who self-identify as middle class are more likely than other panel members to say the worst is behind us. Similarly, of those who are less likely to say so, more than half (57 per cent) reside in British Columbia and self-identify as working class (compared to 66 per cent on average).

Of those who said the worst is yet to come, 30 per cent are from Saskatchewan and self-identify as poor. This means residents of Saskatchewan who self-identify as poor are more likely than other panel members to say the worst is yet to come. Similarly, of those who are less likely to say the worst is yet to come, the same number (nine per cent) reside in Manitoba and self-identify as upper class (compared to 14 per on average).

Chart - Which of the following best describes your outlook on the COVID-19 outbreak?
Chart - Which of the following best describes your outlook on the COVID-19 outbreak?

Next, when asked how long panel members expect it will take until things return to normal, more than a third of Atlantic residents (40 per cent compared to 23 per cent on average) are more likely to say it will take two years or more. Similarly, less than a third (28 per cent compared to 23 per cent) of those who self-identify as poor said the same. This means Atlantic residents who self-identify as poor are more likely than other panel members to say it will take two years or more. Similarly, of those who are less likely to say so, the same number (17 per cent) reside in Quebec City and self-identify as upper (class compared to 23 per on average).

Chart - How long do you expect it will take until things to return to normal?

Lastly, when asked about the level of stress panel members are experiencing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, less than a third (29 per cent) said they experienced a low level of stress. Those who are more likely to say so are males between the ages of 50 and 64 (43 per cent compared to 29 per cent on average), while those who are less likely to say so are females between the ages of 35 and 49 (15 per cent compared to 29 per cent on average). In contrast, more than a third (34 per cent) said they experienced a high level of stress. Those who are more likely to say so are females between the ages of 35 and 49 (47 per cent compared to 34 per cent on average), while those who are less likely to say so are males who are 65 years old and above (20 per cent compared to 34 per cent on average).

Chart - How much stress would you say you are experiencing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic?

In the same survey, when asked if Canada should create a set of national standards when it comes to implementing pandemic-related restrictions, more than half of panel members (57 per cent) agree, including the majority of seniors (70 per cent) and Ontario residents (64 per cent). This means they are more likely than other panel members to agree. Similarly, less than half (47 per cent) of Quebec residents and 48 per cent of those between the ages of 35 and 49 agree (compared to 57 per cent on average), meaning those panel members are less likely than others to agree.

More than a third of Alberta residents (36 per cent) as well as 31 per cent of those between the ages of 35 and 49 (compared to 24 per cent on average), disagree. This means those panel members are more likely than others to disagree. Similarly, only 11 per cent of seniors and 17 per cent of British Columbians disagree (compared to 24 per cent on average), meaning they are less likely than others to disagree.

Less than a quarter of Quebec residents (23 per cent), and those between the ages of 35 and 49 (18 per cent), neither agree nor disagree (compared to 16 per cent on average). This means they are more likely than other panel members to neither agree nor disagree. Similarly, only 11 per cent of Ontario residents and 12 per cent of those between the ages of 50 and 64 neither agree nor disagree (compared to 16 per cent on average), meaning they are less likely than other panel members to neither agree nor disagree.

Chart - Canada should create a set of national standards when it comes to implementing pandemic-related restrictions.

Next, when asked if the varying death rates between provinces is due more to random chance than different provincial government policies, less than quarter of panel members (22 per cent) agree. Less than a third – or 30 per cent – of those who self-identify as working class agree (compared to 22 per cent on average). Similarly, 28 per cent of those who are college educated (compared to 22 per cent on average) agree. This means those panel members who are college educated and self-identify as working class are more likely than other panel members to agree. Similarly, only 13 per cent of those who are university educated and 15 per cent of those who self-identify as poor agree (compared to 22 per cent on average), meaning they are less likely than other panel members to agree.

A majority – or 72 per cent – of those who self-identify as upper class disagree (compared to 57 per cent on average). The same number (72 per cent) of those with a university education said the same (compared to 57 per cent on average). This means those panel members who are university educated and self-identify as upper class are more likely than other panel members to disagree. Similarly, less than half (48 per cent) of those with a high school education and 47 per cent of those who self-identify as working class disagree (compared to 57 per cent on average). This means those panel members are less likely than others to disagree.

Less than a fifth (18 per cent) of panel members who self-identify as working class or poor neither agree nor disagree (compared to 16 per cent on average). Similarly, more than a fifth (21 per cent) of those with a high school education neither agree nor disagree (compared to 16 per cent on average), meaning they are more likely than other panel members to neither agree nor disagree. Similarly, only 11 per cent of those with a university education and eight per cent of those who self-identify as upper class neither agree nor disagree (compared to 16 per cent on average), meaning they are less likely than others to neither agree nor disagree.

Chart - The varying death rates between provinces is due more to random chance than different provincial government policies.


Frequently Asked Questions

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Probit: What We Do

The key principle of Probit‘s methodology that distinguishes our panel from others is that the Probit research panel is probability-based. This allows us to accurately project survey data to the total Canadian population versus non-probability opt-in online panels. For more on this subject, please click here.


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